New book on indigenous peoples, corporate human rights violations and the search for remedies

Dr Cathal Doyle of Middlesex University, and a graduate of the Irish Centre for Human Rights, has just published a new book on indigenous peoples and their experience in seeking remedies for corporate human rights abuses. Cathal edited the work, and together with the various NGOs with whom he collaborated, brings a wealth of experience to this subject. It is a must read for those working on indigenous peoples issues in the field of business and human rights. The book has a particular focus on case studies from Africa, Asia and Latin America:

By drawing from these experiences it seeks to inform the actions of corporate and State actors in relation their business and human rights obligation to ensure that indigenous peoples have access to effective remedy.

The case studies address a variety of business activities, including the extractive industry (mining, oil and gas), tourism, agribusiness, as well as infrastructure and dam projects. As Pavel Sulyandziga puts it in the foreword, these examples:

shed light on the on the significant barriers to effective remedy and the long running struggles which indigenous peoples face when seeking access to justice in contexts where powerful corporate actors and States fail of fulfill their responsibilities and duties to respect and protect indigenous peoples’ rights.

The publication of the book has generated some responses from companies whose activities are referred to in the case studies, including Tullow Oil, whose has oil exploration activities in Kenya “clashed with the rights of the Turkana peoples, a nomadic pastoralist community found in North Western Kenya”.

You can read the company responses here and the full text of the book itself is available for free here.

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